Unit Thirteen (13) Exercises

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hlawson38
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Unit Thirteen (13) Exercises

Post by hlawson38 » Sat Apr 03, 2010 1:07 am

Here are some of the exercises that are too hard for me.

8. Legati illius virtus omnibus civibus admirationi fuit.

The courage of that officer was an inspiration to all the citizens. I don't understand
the use of admirationi.

9. Imperatori quodque sit bellum laudi. ???
I'm stumped.

11. Cui bono fuit. To whom the good. Who gained.


14. Quem uni e nobis saepe praetulit. Which one of us did he often prefer.
I don't understand the use of uni.

Help!!
Hugh Lawson

modus.irrealis
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Re: Unit Thirteen (13) Exercises

Post by modus.irrealis » Mon Apr 05, 2010 4:50 pm

8's also in the other thread so for the rest.
hlawson38 wrote:9. Imperatori quodque sit bellum laudi. ???
I'm stumped.
This one seems difficult to me as well. I understand it as "let every war be an object of praise for the commander"
11. Cui bono fuit. To whom the good. Who gained.
"Who gained" is the meaning, lit. it's like "for whom was it for the good?"
14. Quem uni e nobis saepe praetulit. Which one of us did he often prefer.
I don't understand the use of uni.
Lots of verbs that are prefixed with prae- take a dative, so "uni" goes with "praetulit". I understand it as "Who did he often prefer to one of us?"

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Re: Unit Thirteen (13) Exercises

Post by RexCaudicum » Sat Apr 10, 2010 11:21 pm

hlawson38 wrote:9. Imperatori quodque sit bellum laudi. ???
I'm stumped.
This one seems difficult to me as well. I understand it as "let every war be an object of praise for the commander"[/quote]

I would suggest something like "And may this war be a cause of praise for the commander." I don't really know how to explain this usage of the dative; I shall think on it further.
14. Quem uni e nobis saepe praetulit. Which one of us did he often prefer.
I don't understand the use of uni.
Lots of verbs that are prefixed with prae- take a dative, so "uni" goes with "praetulit". I understand it as "Who did he often prefer to one of us?"[/quote]

The translation seems fair, but the explanaiton is a bit dodgy. It is 'quem' that is the object of the verb; 'uni' is a basic indirect object brought about by the meaning, as shown in the English translation 'to one of us'. Admittedly a fairly minor difference, but one nevertheless.

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Re: Unit Thirteen (13) Exercises

Post by modus.irrealis » Sun Apr 18, 2010 3:17 pm

RexCaudicum wrote:I would suggest something like "And may this war be a cause of praise for the commander." I don't really know how to explain this usage of the dative; I shall think on it further.
How are you understanding "quodque"?
The translation seems fair, but the explanaiton is a bit dodgy. It is 'quem' that is the object of the verb; 'uni' is a basic indirect object brought about by the meaning, as shown in the English translation 'to one of us'. Admittedly a fairly minor difference, but one nevertheless.
Yeah, it does seem like I was suggesting a dative object -- my point was only that "uni" goes with the verb.

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Re: Unit Thirteen (13) Exercises

Post by leisulin » Fri Aug 30, 2019 11:29 pm

modus.irrealis wrote:
Sun Apr 18, 2010 3:17 pm
RexCaudicum wrote:I would suggest something like "And may this war be a cause of praise for the commander." I don't really know how to explain this usage of the dative; I shall think on it further.
It seems to me you came very close. Couldn't this be an example of the "double dative construction" on page 131? Then it could say, in deliberately verbose language like is used on pg. 131: "Every war would/could/might be (for the purpose of) praise (with reference to) the commander". Or more colloquially: "Every war would be a source of praise for the commander". For "sit", it seems like it could be an example of the "potential subjunctive" on page 200. That is how I rendered it. Could I be right? I don't know! :D

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