sentance structure

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Jacqueline
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sentance structure

Post by Jacqueline » Tue Sep 28, 2004 5:52 pm

i am finding it very difficult to get the hang of the sentance structure. i was wondering if anyone could give me a few guide lines or if anyone knows of a good website for this? :wink: the thing that is confusing me is, when does the verb go to the end of a sentance? for example in ex60 if 'fulaka\s pe/mpw' translates as 'i am sending a garrison' why is 'ou' lu\omev ta\j pu\la\s' translated as 'we are not destroying the gates'.

what makes the verb move? and why does the adjective sometimes come before the noun and sometimes after it? i'm very confused! please help me! :oops:

Skylax
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Re: sentance structure

Post by Skylax » Tue Sep 28, 2004 6:54 pm

Jacqueline wrote: what makes the verb move?
Please, don't worry !
The fundamental meaning would be the same with the verb at another place (in the same clause...), because the endings denote the function of the words.
(φύλακας πέμπω ‐‐ πέμπω φύλακας : same meaning, because it is the -aj that indicates that fu/lakaj is direct object. Word order indicates only which words are more important in the author's mind. For example, putting a verb in the beginning of a clause is a little less frequent, thus more surprising, so it draws attention on it. But there can be several reasons to put words at one or another place.

Jacqueline
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Location: Dartford

Post by Jacqueline » Mon Oct 04, 2004 7:08 pm

thanks mate :) so basically the sentance structure is not too important. in that case could a sentance be translated into english in a number of different ways as long as it had the same basic meaning?

Skylax
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Post by Skylax » Mon Oct 04, 2004 8:59 pm

In my mind, it is not the same problem. The Greek language builds sentences in such a way that normally, taking account of the endings of the various words, there is only one meaning expressed (except if it is a joke or something...) , so only one English translation is realy acceptable (though depending on the particular translation principles adopted by a given translator).

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